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*My topic- Immigration reform <
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Using the following writing prompt, writ

*My topic- Immigration reform <
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Using the following writing prompt, write an essay following the guidelines of your chosen topic for your research manuscript. The paper should be 500-750 words.<
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-Write an essay that compares and contrasts two or more written texts that present different perspectives related to your research manuscript topic. You are comparing two articles specifically and not just two sides to the topic.<
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-Complete your paper with the following steps:<
1. Introduce your topic in an introduction statement.<
2. Summarize the ideas from Article 1, make connections to key components within the article.<
3. Summarize the ideas from Article 2, make connections to key components within the article.<
4. Compare and contrast by sharing the similarities and differences between the articles.<
5. Conclude by making connections between the compare and contrast and your topic specifically.<
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Assignment Submission<
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· Use of outside resources is required and all papers must be cited and written in APA format.

There are three parts to the research proposal that you are going to submit here

There are three parts to the research proposal that you are going to submit here in the online classroom: a topic proposal (two pages in length), a traditional outline of your topic (one page), and an annotated list of three potential resources (one page) that you might use in your larger research argument.
Please upload a single, four-page document here in the online classroom before the submission deadline noted in the course calendar.
Format Requirements
Use Times New Roman, 12-pt font for all of your work
Use double spacing for the topic proposal and the annotated citations and single spacing for the outline.
Include a running header (right justified) on each page with your last name and the page number.
The document should include the following information in the upper left corner of the first page of the document:
Student Name
Professor Name
Course Number
Assignment due date
Topic Proposal
The first two pages of this document should include your research proposal. Your work should address each of the following six areas listed below, and you need to include a word count inside a parenthesis at the conclusion of each section. Please follow the word-count guidelines listed for each section as follows:
Summary (100–150 words)
Purpose (50–100 words)
Audience (50–100 words)
Opening Statement, Thesis, or Hypothesis (50–100 words)
Method, Materials, and Data (50–100 words)
Expected Outcomes (50–100 words)
Outline
The third page of your proposal should include a traditional outline (Roman numerals, capital letters, numbers, and lower-case letters) that plots the course for your research paper. It is okay if this plan changes in the course of your writing process, but for now you are just illustrating forethought in planning your work.
Annotated Citations
The fourth and final pages of your proposal should include the alphabetized citations for three resources that you might use to support your research argument. Each citation should include as much publication information from the core elements of the MLA documentation style as you can identify as well as a written annotation of 2-3 sentences outlining the features of this particular resource.
Please note that annotations are not required in the final draft of your research paper, which has a requirement of ten resources. This exercise is meant only to orient you to a common research practice that you are likely to encounter in future college classes. You can remove the annotations and paste the citations into your Works Cited page when you have finished the final draft or your research argument.
Here is a sample for what your final page should resemble:
Annotated List of Works Cited
Adams, Sarah. “Writing the College Term Paper.” College Language Association Journal, vol. 1, Southern University, spring 2016.
This article by Sarah Adams outlines the steps necessary to compose a persuasive college term paper. The piece includes sections on composing the introduction, finding and evaluating resources, and compiling a list of citations. I plan to use her advice on developing an interesting hook, where she notes that clear college writing should capture the reader’s attention from the first page.

There are three parts to the research proposal that you are going to submit here

There are three parts to the research proposal that you are going to submit here in the online classroom: a topic proposal (two pages in length), a traditional outline of your topic (one page), and an annotated list of three potential resources (one page) that you might use in your larger research argument.
Please upload a single, four-page document here in the online classroom before the submission deadline noted in the course calendar.
Format Requirements
Use Times New Roman, 12-pt font for all of your work
Use double spacing for the topic proposal and the annotated citations and single spacing for the outline.
Include a running header (right justified) on each page with your last name and the page number.
The document should include the following information in the upper left corner of the first page of the document:
Student Name
Professor Name
Course Number
Assignment due date
Topic Proposal
The first two pages of this document should include your research proposal. Your work should address each of the following six areas listed below, and you need to include a word count inside a parenthesis at the conclusion of each section. Please follow the word-count guidelines listed for each section as follows:
Summary (100–150 words)
Purpose (50–100 words)
Audience (50–100 words)
Opening Statement, Thesis, or Hypothesis (50–100 words)
Method, Materials, and Data (50–100 words)
Expected Outcomes (50–100 words)
Outline
The third page of your proposal should include a traditional outline (Roman numerals, capital letters, numbers, and lower-case letters) that plots the course for your research paper. It is okay if this plan changes in the course of your writing process, but for now you are just illustrating forethought in planning your work.
Annotated Citations
The fourth and final pages of your proposal should include the alphabetized citations for three resources that you might use to support your research argument. Each citation should include as much publication information from the core elements of the MLA documentation style as you can identify as well as a written annotation of 2-3 sentences outlining the features of this particular resource.
Please note that annotations are not required in the final draft of your research paper, which has a requirement of ten resources. This exercise is meant only to orient you to a common research practice that you are likely to encounter in future college classes. You can remove the annotations and paste the citations into your Works Cited page when you have finished the final draft or your research argument.
Here is a sample for what your final page should resemble:
Annotated List of Works Cited
Adams, Sarah. “Writing the College Term Paper.” College Language Association Journal, vol. 1, Southern University, spring 2016.
This article by Sarah Adams outlines the steps necessary to compose a persuasive college term paper. The piece includes sections on composing the introduction, finding and evaluating resources, and compiling a list of citations. I plan to use her advice on developing an interesting hook, where she notes that clear college writing should capture the reader’s attention from the first page.

Your proposal must begin with an evaluation of a problem where you convince your

Your proposal must begin with an evaluation of a problem where you convince your reader that yours is a problem worth solving. Why should your reader care about this problem? Why is it important to solve this problem? What might happen if we don’t solve this problem? This portion of your essay should be between 1 and 1.5 pages (300-400 words).
Next, you must argue a clear and focused systemic analysis of one problem. This means arguing a manageable, underlying cause or chain of causes that is part of your “big problem.” Big problems (such as climate change, drug addiction, or world hunger) are the result of multiple causes, but you can’t expect to cover all of them. Analysis comes into play as you argue how and why one underlying, systemic cause contributes to this larger problem. This portion of your essay should be between 2 and 3 pages (600-750 words).
Finally, based on this causal analysis, propose a reasonable and applicable solution. Again, the key here is to have already analyzed one systemic cause in order to propose to a manageable solution at all; if your problem is too broad (such as climate change, drug addiction, or world hunger), you won’t be able to provide a clear and focused solution. Make sure that what you propose is a plan that could actually be implemented in the real world, not something like “We need to raise awareness” or “Money should be raised to solve this problem.” This portion of your essay should be between 2 and 3 pages (600-750 words).
Your proposal should be supported by two academic, peer reviewed sources from the Academic Search Ultimate database. One of your academic sources must provide evidence of the problem (to be used in either your evaluation or systemic analysis section) and one must provide evidence for success (to be used in your solution section).
Due to the nature of this essay genre, you are also allowed to provide supplementary research from non-academic sources. However, non-academic sources cannot be used as a substitute for your academic sources. Also, any non-academic sources must still come from credible, established organizations (.gov, .edu, and .org websites are usually acceptable) and/or publications (periodicals such as Time or Newsweek), not anonymous personal blogs or open-source websites like Wikipedia or Ask.com.
An MLA formatted Works Cited page is required for all sources (including non-academic sources if you use any).

CHAPTER 20 ATTACCHED After reading Chapter 20 in GrizzWrites, the Sample Studen

CHAPTER 20 ATTACCHED
After reading Chapter 20 in GrizzWrites, the Sample Student Rhetorical Analysis, comment on the following in 2-4 paragraphs:
1) How well did the student author comment on the Rhetor (who each author was, their backgrounds, etc.)?
2) How well did the student author analyze the Audience (who each publication’s readers are)?
3) How well did the student author discuss the Purpose (why each piece was written when it was)?
4) Did the student author mention rhetorical appeals used in each piece? If so, what were they?
5) Overall, if you were peer reviewing this student author based on the criteria YOU are using for your Rhetorical Analysis, what guidance would you give this student in how to improve the essay?

CHAPTER 22 WILL BE. ATTACHED After reading Chapter 22 in GrizzWrites, the Sample

CHAPTER 22 WILL BE. ATTACHED
After reading Chapter 22 in GrizzWrites, the Sample Student Rhetorical Analysis, comment on the following in 2-4 paragraphs:
Has the student rhetorically analyzed at least two artifacts?
Has the student discussed writing in the field: when, why, how much, what types of writing/communicating?
Has the student discussed how rhetorical appeals are used to communicate effectively in the field?
Has the student discussed controversies in the field?
Has the student discussed public perception of communication in the field gained from his/her survey?
Has the student integrated quotes from the interview source to flesh out the paper?
Is there an Appendix A & B (for artifacts) and and Appendix C (for the interview transcript) in the back of the paper?
Has the student used at least 3 secondary sources (aside from the artifacts and interview) and listed them in a Works Cited page?
Are quotes from the secondary sources quoted appropriately using MLA style?
If any of the above answers are NO, let me know what the student should have done differently.