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Imagine you are at your niece’s school Christmas program, and you run into a for

Imagine you are at your niece’s school Christmas program, and you run into a former client. You are having a short, pleasant conversation and he asks you what your new company offers. This excites you because you know he could become an important client. You start to tell him, but you are not sure what you should focus on. You stumble over your words. When your thoughts are finally coming together, your friend’s daughter runs over and begs him to come to meet her teacher. He kindly excuses himself, leaving you feeling disappointed you hadn’t been more prepared.
Had you crafted an elevator pitch before this encounter, you would have been ready for this moment in the elementary gymnasium. An elevator pitch is a clear and concise summary of your business model that you can recite without a moment’s notice. It should give enough information to spark interest in potential stakeholders but not bogged down with too many details. Your pitch should always be easy to understand and end with a call to action.
Look at the Craft Your Elevator Speech (Abrams, 2009) worksheet found in the required articles. (See attached)
Write complete but short sentences that address the eight main components of your elevator pitch. Edit these sentences down to a pitch that is between 100 and 150 words long.
Add a call to action at the end that would allow you to obtain the contact information of the party involved or that would lead them to your point of sale.

Imagine you are at your niece’s school Christmas program, and you run into a for

Imagine you are at your niece’s school Christmas program, and you run into a former client. You are having a short, pleasant conversation and he asks you what your new company offers. This excites you because you know he could become an important client. You start to tell him, but you are not sure what you should focus on. You stumble over your words. When your thoughts are finally coming together, your friend’s daughter runs over and begs him to come to meet her teacher. He kindly excuses himself, leaving you feeling disappointed you hadn’t been more prepared.
Had you crafted an elevator pitch before this encounter, you would have been ready for this moment in the elementary gymnasium. An elevator pitch is a clear and concise summary of your business model that you can recite without a moment’s notice. It should give enough information to spark interest in potential stakeholders but not bogged down with too many details. Your pitch should always be easy to understand and end with a call to action.
Look at the Craft Your Elevator Speech (Abrams, 2009) worksheet found in the required articles. (See attached)
Write complete but short sentences that address the eight main components of your elevator pitch. Edit these sentences down to a pitch that is between 100 and 150 words long.
Add a call to action at the end that would allow you to obtain the contact information of the party involved or that would lead them to your point of sale.

Imagine you are at your niece’s school Christmas program, and you run into a for

Imagine you are at your niece’s school Christmas program, and you run into a former client. You are having a short, pleasant conversation and he asks you what your new company offers. This excites you because you know he could become an important client. You start to tell him, but you are not sure what you should focus on. You stumble over your words. When your thoughts are finally coming together, your friend’s daughter runs over and begs him to come to meet her teacher. He kindly excuses himself, leaving you feeling disappointed you hadn’t been more prepared.
Had you crafted an elevator pitch before this encounter, you would have been ready for this moment in the elementary gymnasium. An elevator pitch is a clear and concise summary of your business model that you can recite without a moment’s notice. It should give enough information to spark interest in potential stakeholders but not bogged down with too many details. Your pitch should always be easy to understand and end with a call to action.
Look at the Craft Your Elevator Speech (Abrams, 2009) worksheet found in the required articles. (See attached)
Write complete but short sentences that address the eight main components of your elevator pitch. Edit these sentences down to a pitch that is between 100 and 150 words long.
Add a call to action at the end that would allow you to obtain the contact information of the party involved or that would lead them to your point of sale.

Initial Post: Think through the business logic behind the idea you have chosen t

Initial Post:
Think through the business logic behind the idea you have chosen to develop in this course.
Online, do primary market research and fact-checking in relation to your idea.
Once you have a clear understanding of how your business model’s building blocks might relate to one another, outline your idea by filling in the canvas template (as shown in your textbook and in the provided videos).
Write a brief but well-justified business case explaining to your classmates your business model and why you think it is viable. Be sure to reference market research to back up your claims (200-250 words).
Upload your completed Business Model Canvas and description to the discussion board.
Instructions:
You may fill out the Business Model Canvas digitally or by hand, as long as it is legible and complete.
Upload your completed Business Model Canvas and description to the discussion board.
Length: 200-250 words and the Business Model Canvas.
Grading: Refer to the rubric for grading criteria.

I’m working on a entrepreneurship question and need guidance to help me learn.Pa

I’m working on a entrepreneurship question and need guidance to help me learn.Paul filed a lawsuit for false imprisonment against Dan’s Bookstore. During a visit to Dan’sBookstore, Dan stopped Paul as he left the store. Dan accused Paul of stealing a book from thestore. After briefly looking into Paul’s shopping bag, Dan determined that Paul did not shoplift.He apologized to Paul and released him. On these facts, Dan will likely:a. win the case, because the shopkeepers’ privilege statute gives store merchants unconditionalimmunity (protection) from such lawsuits.b. lose the case, because Paul did not shoplift.c. win the case, but only if a court or trier of fact concludes that Dan had reasonable cause tobelieve Paul may have shoplifted, detained him for a reasonable time, and in a reasonablemanner.d. lose the case, because Dan did not have a warrant. Bonds wrote McGuire, “I will sell you my house and lot at 419 West Lombard Street, SanFrancisco, California for $950,000 payable upon merchantable deed, deal to be completed within60 days of the date of your acceptance.” Assuming that Bonds’ letter contains terms which aredeemed sufficiently certain and definite, which of the following statements is correct?a. Bonds’ letter is not an offer unless Bonds intended it to be an offer.b. Bonds’ letter is not an offer unless McGuire thought Bonds intended to make an offer.c. Bonds’ letter is an offer if a reasonable person with full knowledge of the circumstanceswould be justified in thinking it was intended as an offer..d. Bonds’ letter is not a offer unless both Bonds and McGuire considered it as an offer.
Requirements: 2 questions

After reading the Danone Case Study please answer the following question in no l

After reading the Danone Case Study please answer the following question in no less than 350 words and no more than 500 words. Was the Danimal project successful? Why? Do you think Maria Pretorius’s role in the Danimal project is such that if she switches to new responsibilities the project will stagnate and eventually fail?I attached an example and you can base pretty much most of it off of that but please make sure nothing is copied from the example. You can include any innovation and entrepreunirship topics that you have knowledge of that are related to the case study.
Requirements: 350-500 words

After reading the Danone Case Study please answer the following question in no l

After reading the Danone Case Study please answer the following question in no less than 350 words and no more than 500 words. Was the Danimal project successful? Why? Do you think Maria Pretorius’s role in the Danimal project is such that if she switches to new responsibilities the project will stagnate and eventually fail?I attached an example and you can base pretty much most of it off of that but please make sure nothing is copied from the example. You can include any innovation and entrepreunirship topics that you have knowledge of that are related to the case study.
Requirements: 350-500 words