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Part 1: Watch Cave of forgotten dreams. https://vimeo.com/429523139?embedded=tru

Part 1: Watch Cave of forgotten dreams.

What are your thoughts or impressions on anything about the movie?
Part 2: Watch Nanook of the north

What point-of-view does Robert Flaherty adopt in Nanook of the North and what are its implications?
Considering what you saw in the movie and have learned about in Flaherty’s making of it – casting the film, using reenactments, questionable ethical decisions, etc. – would you consider Nanook of the North to be a truthful document? Explain why or why not.

For your final paper, consider the readings and film selections in the course. W

For your final paper, consider the readings and film selections in the course. Write a 3 page paper on what is history viewed through the cinematic lens by describing and providing examples from the readings and films. Discuss what are the benefits of learning history through films and other visual mediums.
Your paper should include citations from the readings and examples from films we have watched in the course as well as other films you may have seen reflecting  a key part of American history.
Questions to consider:
1. What is history? Why is it important? (aside from dooming to repeat it)
2. What are significant elements of the idea of America? (i.e. pursuit of happiness, hard work, etc)

Compare and analysis two films Main focus:1.  the similarity of two films. 2. Gl

Compare and analysis two films
Main focus:1.  the similarity of two films. 2. Global and local relationship. 3. Find evidence about the director. 4. Analysis the film language
Two Movies: A Confucian Confusion ( Dir, Edward Yang, 1994).
Mahjong ( Dir, Edward Yang, 1996)
Paper Content: 
• Your paper must be written in your own words and based on your own research findings; plagiarism, plot summary, or paraphrase of a secondary source will not be tolerated.   
• Please write a cogent essay in which you begin by stating a problematic (thesis), then go on to identify theme(s) or text(s) you plan to analyze or compare, to examine textual evidence in detail to support your argument, to draw on current scholarships, and to conclude with your original insights. 
• While important to review major findings in the field, you should demonstrate
your critical capacity by engaging the experts and sustaining your own line of
arguments between primary and secondary sources.
Paper Format: 
• Your paper must be typed, double-spaced with one-inch margin on all four sides
of the page. 
• Please staple your 5-6 pages of text followed by a works cited page. You should proof-read  your  writing  carefully,  making  sure  that  there  are  no  spelling, grammar, or punctuation mistakes. 
Also, Please use at least 3 outside sources to illustrate the paper.
Below are all the things you can compare:
Language: Taiwanese or Japanese vs Mandarin in the transitional period of resinfication
Plotting: multiple narrative Voices and Decentering
Casting: Established stars vs Common people
Shooting: tunnel vision in Wu vs Yang; Light vs Darkness and shadow
Setting: arch/corridor/door/frame/gateway or threshold/wall/window
Marriage and Confucian family values
Building and ambience: Japanese baroque vs. modern skyscraper

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater Chi

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater China Region and write a short essay discussing its uniqueness and similarity with other new waves/new cinemas after the 1960s in the world, as well as what makes it “new” in terms of film aesthetics:
1. Hong Kong New Wave
(1) Father and Son (Allen Fong, 1981)
(2) Boat People (Ann Hui, 1982)
2. Taiwan New Cinema
(1) The Boys from Fengkuei (1983)
(2) Taipei Story (1985)
3. The Fifth Generation of China
(1) Yellow Earth (Chen Kaige, 1984)
(2) The Black Cannon Incident (Huang Jianxin, 1985)
(3) The Horse Thieves (Tian Zhunagzhuang, 1986)
(4) Red Sorghum (Zhang Yimou, 1987)
Word limit: minimum 500 English words (Chinese 800 words).
You need to make your argument based on the required readings, class lecture, and your own thoughts. You need to cite your sources when using other people’s writings. Remember to include a cover page with all the vital information.

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater Chi

Please choose one of the following New Waves or New Cinemas from the Greater China Region and write a short essay discussing its uniqueness and similarity with other new waves/new cinemas after the 1960s in the world, as well as what makes it “new” in terms of film aesthetics:
1. Hong Kong New Wave
(1) Father and Son (Allen Fong, 1981)
(2) Boat People (Ann Hui, 1982)
2. Taiwan New Cinema
(1) The Boys from Fengkuei (1983)
(2) Taipei Story (1985)
3. The Fifth Generation of China
(1) Yellow Earth (Chen Kaige, 1984)
(2) The Black Cannon Incident (Huang Jianxin, 1985)
(3) The Horse Thieves (Tian Zhunagzhuang, 1986)
(4) Red Sorghum (Zhang Yimou, 1987)
Word limit: minimum 500 English words (Chinese 800 words).
You need to make your argument based on the required readings, class lecture, and your own thoughts. You need to cite your sources when using other people’s writings. Remember to include a cover page with all the vital information.

Read and understand the assignment completely. Read all of the Course Notes and

Read and understand the assignment completely. Read all of the Course Notes and Writing Workshop notes, as well as the assigned textbook pages. Too often we have encountered wonderfully written essays that left out some key parts of the assignment, and have had to deduct points from a student that is clearly capable of writing a strong assignment.
Use proper terminology. Be sure to review the terminology from all previous modules and to use the specific film analysis terms where appropriate. These terms are what help the reader “see” what’s in the image – without them the reader either has to guess what you mean or rely on your say-so.
Be specific and use concrete examples. Whenever you make a claim about the film – whether it is about a character trait, a formal element used for a specific purpose, a narrative structure, or anything else, you must follow it up with a concrete example from the film. This example must involve a description of a specific case of the thing you are arguing for as it appears in the film, using proper terminology.
Preparation. The following steps allow you to prepare to write a strong critical essay:
1. Read about the film and develop some starting questions you will ask yourself during the viewing.
2. Actively view the film at least 3 times, each time focusing more and more squarely on scenes, formal elements, or events that you will want to discuss in your paper. Make a note of where they appear in the film.
3. Select a methodology that will best suit your argument.
4. Do background research to help you support your argument.
5. Write an outline including a thesis statement and supporting evidence in full sentences.
Organization. The following are the parts of a critical essay:
1. Introduction where you set up a problem or question about the film and present a thesis statement where you teach the reader something about the film in relation to the problem you have decided to tackle.
2. A body of the essay where each paragraph presents a single piece of supporting evidence. Supporting evidence may include a summary of your research, a character description or summary of an important theme of the plot, or a description of a key piece of textual evidence using appropriate terminology.
3. A conclusion where you expand or in some way problematize your thesis based on the information presented in the body of the essay.
Revise! Look for spelling, grammar, and sentence structure. But also keep an eye out for the flow of the argument, make sure you have proper transitions between your paragraphs, and be ruthless with repetitions or extraneous information that is left behind from earlier versions. DELETE RUTHLESSLY so your essay is clear and economical in both writing and structure. Have an outside reader review your essay for the things you have seen too many times and no longer notice.
Review all of your previous feedback and make sure you address the issues in your final paper.
Cite properly. The film time you mention a film in your essay, you must follow it up with parenthetical citation unless those things are mentioned previously in your paper. For example: The Birds (Hitchcock, 1963) or “Alfred Hitchcock’s film The Birds (1963)” or “Alfred Hitchcock released The Birds in 1963.”
When citing an article, be sure to include the page number in the text and full citation in the bibliography.
Be creative! Say something interesting, unique or unexpected, and then challenge yourself to back it up.